This is a category taken from the full feed of Musculoskeletal and Arthritis news provided by ARMA's members.
  • The Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Alliance (ARMA) is the umbrella body for the arthritis and musculoskeletal community in the UK, and our mission is to transform the quality of life of people with musculoskeletal conditions. We have 33 member organisations ranging from specialised support groups for rare diseases to major research charities and national professional bodies.

Tag: Sport and Exercise Medicine

A new campaign, We are Undefeatable, launched on 2 September from Sport England and associated partners including Versus Arthritis.

The campaign aims to help people with health conditions find ways to get active. With a long term condition you are two times more likely to be inactive. Physical activity plays a powerful role, it can help manage 20 or more conditions and reduce the risk of many health conditions by up to 40%.

Sport England are challenging the existing narrative and working with partners to challenge the status quo. They created a unified physical activity campaign which challenges misconceptions and finds a strong emotional platform to engage and motivate and sustain behaviour change across health conditions.  It’s designed with the perspective and lived experience of people with health conditions.

It’s aimed at an audience from ages 30-64 years old and beyond and at people who are doing a little physical activity, less than 30 minutes, or none. For more information see Twitter @undefeatable or www.weareundefeatable.co.uk

The Oxford University Hospitals Foundation Trust Pilot

By Dr Christopher Speers, Sport and Exercise Medicine Consultant Oxford University Hospitals Foundation Trust

Physical inactivity is the fourth leading cause of death worldwide1 and it contributes significantly to the worldwide burden of non-communicable disease2, 3. Hospitals, historically, have been dominated by a culture of rest4. Promoting rest contradicts the evidence which clearly demonstrates that disease outcomes are better for moving more and that post hospital syndrome, or hospital deconditioning, leads to increased risk and adverse outcomes5, 6. Furthermore, there is a significant evidence-base demonstrating the potential for physical activity to improve management and treatment outcomes for a wide range of long-term health conditions, including arthritis7.

Healthcare provides a unique point of access to a section of the population who are likely to gain the most from only small improvements in increasing their physical activity. Therefore hospital admission is a key opportunity to influence patients to change behaviour for the better. This preventative approach to healthcare is a key objective of the NHS 10 year plan8.

‘Moving Healthcare Professionals’ forms part of Public Health England’s (PHE) ‘Everybody Active Every Day’ strategy9, and aims to engage professional networks to support understanding and awareness of, and greater engagement in, physical activity among the wider public.

In 2017, PHE and Sport England invited expressions of interest from applicable NHS Trusts (i.e. the Trust employs a Sports and Exercise Medicine (SEM) consultant to deliver a SEM pilot in secondary care. We were successful and were commissioned to deliver an SEM pilot that focused on the integration of physical activity into care pathways within secondary care.

The primary aim of the SEM pilot was to explore the potential for multi-disciplinary SEM teams in secondary care to contribute to patient outcomes through targeted and tailored support to integrate physical activity into the care plans of in-patients prior to discharge. We developed physical activity interventions across five different clinical pathways involving multi-morbidity and frailty (figure 1). Each intervention was designed using the COM-B model and Behaviour Change Wheel10. A clinical champion was employed within each pathway to develop and deliver the interventions, provide leadership and training to other staff within that clinical setting.

clinical pathways diagram

A range of different interventions were used to improve the levels of physical activity in patients, but underpinning our approach was an ambition to target healthcare professionals and change their behaviour to improving the frequency and quality of conversations between staff and patients about physical activity. Tools to do this included integrating the Exercise Vital Sign11, 12 into electronic patient records, staff training in motivational interviewing, exercise classes, as well as bed-, chair-based, and standing-exercise programs matched to functional ability of patients. A community navigator was available to help patients and staff members find community-based exercise teams and classes during the discharge process to ensure integrated care.

External independent evaluation was undertaken by the National Centre for Sport and Exercise Medicine in Sheffield; early reports have shown that this approach is highly valued and acceptable to patients and staff within the NHS. We have learnt a huge amount about integrating physical activity into secondary care systems throughout the pilot, and are going to publish our findings, learning and experience in the form of an ‘Active Hospital Toolkit’ later in 2019. This will be accessible through the Moving Medicine website.

References:

  1. Kohl HW, Craig CL, Lambert EV, Inoue S, Alkandari JR, Leetongin G, Kahlmeier S; Lancet Physical Activity Series Working Group. The pandemic of physical inactivity: global action for public health. Lancet. 2012 Jul 21;380(9838):294-305.
  2. Lee IM, Shiroma EJ, Lobelop F, Puska P, Blair SN, Katzmarzyk PT; Lancet Physical Activity Series Working Group. Effect of physical inactivity on major non-communicable diseases worldwide: an analysis of burden of disease and life expectancy. Lancet. 2012 Jul 21;380(9838):219-29.
  3. Blair SN. (2009) Physical inactivity: the biggest public health problem of the 21st century. British Journal of Sports Medicine; 43:1-2
  4. Brown CJ, Redden DT, Flood KL, Allman RM. The underrecognized epidemic of low mobility during hospitalization of older adults. J Am Geriatr Soc . 2009;57:1660–1665.
  5. HM Krumholz Post-hospital syndrome—an acquired, transient condition of generalized risk. N Engl J Med 2013; 368:100-102.
  6. Wen CP, Wai JPM, Tsai MK, Yang YC, Cheng TYD, Lee M, et al. (2011) Minimum effort of physical activity for reduced mortality and extended life expectancy. The Lancet; 378:(9798): 1244-1253.
  7. Gleeson, M., Bishop, N. C., Stensel, D. J., Lindley, M. R., Mastana, S. S. & Nimmo, M. A. 2011. The anti-inflammatory effects of exercise: mechanisms and implications for the prevention and treatment of disease. Nature Reviews Immunology, 11,
  8. NHS England NHS Long Term Plan. https://www.longtermplan.nhs.uk/ (accessed on 27.03.2019.
  9. Public Health England 2014. Everybody Active Everyday: National Physical Activity Framework. In: ENGLAND, P. H. (ed.). London: Public Health England.
  10. Michie, S., Atkins, L. & West, R. 2014. The behaviour change wheel: A guide to designing interventions, Great Britain, Silverback Publishing
  11. Sallis R, Franklin B, Joy L, et al. Strategies for promoting physical activity in clinical practice. Prog Cardiovasc Dis 2015;57:375–86.
  12. Coleman KJ, Ngor E, Reynolds K, et al. Initial Validation of an Exercise ‘Vital Sign’ in Electronic Medical Records. Med Sci Sport Exerc 2012;44:2071–6

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by Dr Hamish Reid, Consultant in Sport and Exercise Medicine, Moving Medicine design and development lead

Moving Medicine is an exciting new initiative by the Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine in partnership with Public Health England and Sport England. It is dedicated to spreading best practice, research and advice to clinicians and patients to create a healthier, happier and more active nation. On the 16th October 2018 the initiative was formally launched by the Honourable Matt Hancock, Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, headlining the flagship set of resources to support high quality conversations on physical activity across a broad range of chronic diseases including musculoskeletal pain.

Why is it important?

The UK is currently suffering epidemic levels of physical inactivity in keeping with global trends. This inactivity causes a heavy burden of morbidity and mortality. This burden, In contrast to communicable disease, can be prevented and effectively treated through moving more. In no areas is this more important that musculoskeletal conditions.

At the heart of intervention in healthcare lie conversations between healthcare professionals and members of the public. These conversations provide a unique opportunity to interact with the least active members of society, but many healthcare professionals currently lack the skills, knowledge and systems to deliver impactful conversations on physical activity.

How has it been developed?

The ‘prescribing movement’ resources have been developed by a large team of Sport and Exercise Medicine doctors in consultation with 300 medical specialists, general practitioners, researchers and patients. The foundations of the content lie in robust reviews of the literature on physical activity in specific diseases and differ from other resources summarising the evidence base on physical activity as the structure has been designed by clinicians for clinicians to use in practise. A knowledge into action framework, Delphi study and behavioural change framework have underpinned this iterative development process. The result enables the user to dig as deep as they want to into the evidence base, embedded in a time-based framework to support good quality conversations based on established behavioural change techniques and motivational interviewing theory.

What does this mean for musculoskeletal care?

The Moving Medicine musculoskeletal pain resource has been designed with experts in musculoskeletal care in partnership with many ARMA members. Due to the exceptional input from the ARMA network this resource has been developed to fulfil an unmet need in the excellent resources available. It is a practical resource to support and inform clinical staff in routine practice and has been designed to support conversations.

We encourage everyone to use and share the resources. If you are keen to find out more or contribute to the Moving Medicine to get in touch with us at contactus@movingmedicine.ac.uk, join our Facebook ambassador group or follow us on twitter @movingmedicine – we would love to hear from you.

Visit the website at www.movingmedicine.ac.uk.

Taking place on Wednesday 21 November 2018 at 6pm in London.

Hear and debate three perspectives on physical activity at the Annual ARMA Lecture, this year in partnership with Versus Arthritis. Three outstanding speakers, Nick Pearson, CEO parkrun, Michael Brennan, Physical Activity Programme Manager, Public Health England and Claire Harris, Physiotherapist speak to the theme: More people, more active, more often: three perspectives on physical activity and musculoskeletal health

Physical activity is good for promoting musculoskeletal health and helps alleviate the symptoms of musculoskeletal conditions. Yet nearly a quarter of adults in the UK are physically inactive. Getting people active is an obvious way to reduce the costs of MSK conditions to individuals, the NHS and the economy. If activity brings such benefits, why is this so difficult? How can we overcome the barriers people face in getting more active? And what additional barriers are faced by those who have an MSK condition? How can we harness the powers of statutory, voluntary, private sectors and communities to tackle this?

The evening will begin with a drinks reception and the lecture will conclude with a question and answer session, with questions taken from an audience of leading health and public health professionals, policy makers, commissioners, patients, and representatives of professional bodies.

Tickets are available here

The Fit4Change app converts miles to money for charities, giving an extra incentive to take regular physical activity that will improve your MSK health. You can use it for running, walking, cycling and exercising indoors.

Just download the Fit4Change app to your phone, select Arthritis and Musc Alliance as your chosen charity, remember to start before you begin your activity and finish at the end, and the app does the rest. It’s a simple way to support our work – just remember to start the app whenever you start your activity.

The Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine has updated its position statement Physical Activity in Adolescence. The statement is a useful reference document for both the Sport and Exercise Medicine community and all health professionals, with evidence-informed recommendations for health-related physical activity.

The statement highlights recent objective studies, which have collected data using accelerometry, indicate that less than 25% of adolescents accumulate an average of 60 min per day of moderate physical activity. The guidelines include information on muscle strength, skeletal health, obesity, mental health and wellbeing with recommendations for the type and length of regular physical activity in this population. Read Physical Activity in Adolescence here.

7th Podiatric Sports Medicine Conference
in Association with European College of Sports and Exercise Physicians

Conference by The College of Podiatry Special Advisory Groups

The Podiatric Sports Medicine Conference is back in 2018 and will take place at the Hallam Conference Centre, London on Thursday 13 – Friday 14 September 2018. 

This two-day conference will include lectures, workshops and informal discussions delivered by experts from across Europe. Topics include: an update on aetiology, treatment and pathomechanics of achilles tendinopathy and plantar heel pain, regenerative medicine, extra-corporeal shock wave therapy and many more. 

Click here for fees and booking.

Get Dynamic: Hormones, Health and Human Performance

What are the key Endocrine and Metabolic considerations for elite athletes to reluctant exercisers?

Discussion, led by experienced clinicians and researchers will cover:

  • Key role of Sports Endocrinology in health and performance
  • Effects of exercise modalities on body composition and bone health
  • Machine learning in interpreting biochemical & metabolic patterns
  • Endocrine & metabolic markers in assessing health & training status
  • Gut metabolism in supporting health and performance
  • Exercise as crucial lifestyle factor in pre-existing metabolic dysfunction

22 March 2018
The Keepmoat Stadium
Doncaster

See more details, including the programme and list of speakers at:
http://www.basem.co.uk/education/basem-spring-conference-2018/