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Resources

The Global Alliance for Musculoskeletal Health is delighted to inform you about the paper “Reducing the global burden of musculoskeletal conditions” published online in the WHO Bulletin, May 2018.

International experts, working with The Global Alliance for Musculoskeletal Health, are calling for global action from health authorities to address the huge burden of musculoskeletal conditions, which affect about one in three people worldwide, including younger people.

You can view the “Reducing the global burden of musculoskeletal conditionspaper here.

The paper examines the global impact of more than 150 musculoskeletal conditions, including back and neck pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and fractures, and set three priorities for global action.

After months of scoping, National Voices has announced the launch of a Peer Support Hub.

The Hub will bring together high quality resources for providing peer support for health and wellbeing.

Find out more about the Hub or sign up to the Peer Support Hub mailing list.

 

The State of Musculoskeletal Health 2018 is a resource for health professionals, policy makers, public health leads and anyone interested in musculoskeletal health. We believe that with the best information you can build awareness, make more informed decisions, feel more confident and ultimately help more people with musculoskeletal conditions. The resource was put together by Arthritis Research UK.

Using the best available data on prevalence, risk factors and comorbidities, the report lays out the key factors affecting musculoskeletal health, the economic benefits of musculoskeletal research, and describes the scale and impact of the problem.

You can read more details on the report from the arthritisresearchuk.org website and download the full set of statistics (PDF 2.9 MB).

Health Education England, together with South, Central and West Commissioning Support Unit, has developed an easy-to-use tool to support clinicians, managers and commissioners in their efforts to forecast and monitor the impacts of MSK self-referral to first contact practitioners (FCP).

It is called the MSK First Point of Contact Model.

The model would be useful for anyone considering:

  •     Writing a business case for a first contact practitioner service
  •     Evaluating the impact of an already established FCP service
  •     Planning a service improvement initiative within a MSK health system

You can find and download the model from ARMA’s Network Resources page.

Guest blog by David Albury, Board Director Innovation Unit

Why have so many innovations in the NHS failed to make the impact they might because they remain in isolated pockets and never spread? Here at the Innovation Unit we decided to look at this question from a more positive angle and ask where innovation has spread and what made that possible?

There is broad agreement that the pressures and challenges currently facing the NHS can only be addressed through developing and scaling innovations that significantly improve outcomes whilst significantly reducing costs. This is as true in musculoskeletal services as in other sectors.

But proven innovations and best practice tend to spread slowly in the NHS. Innovations such as first contact physiotherapist or ESCAPE-pain remained as isolated pockets of good practice long after they had been shown to be effective. ESCAPE-Pain is now rolling out in many areas, thanks to a grant from Sport England, but the first evidence that it worked was as long ago as 2007.

The barriers to spreading innovation have gained a lot of attention. The Innovation Unit, in collaboration with the Health Foundation, wanted to look at the enablers – what will help the spread of good practice. We looked at ten examples of successful spread of innovation in the NHS. Our report identifies common factors that enabled their spread. Whilst none of the case studies were in MSK, the key enablers we identified will apply equally well to MSK innovation.

Our eight key enablers

In pursuit of spread:
1. Building demand through existing networks and narratives
2. Using evidence to build demand
3. Balancing fidelity, quality and adaptability
4. Scaling vehicles rather than lone champions

Creating the conditions for spread:
5. Capitalising on national and local system priorities
6. Using policy and financial levers to kick start momentum
7. Commissioning for sustainable spread
8. External funding to support spread

Read Against the Odds for more on the eight key enablers and some provocations for system leaders, funders and innovators. We hope you will find it useful as you face the challenges of how to spread innovation and good practice in MSK across the NHS.

The London Choosing Wisely programme is a clinically-led review of evidence for a set of surgical procedures. It looks to ensure they are used consistently across London and their use follows a criteria that ultimately improves the health of patients.

Aim of the review
To make sure people with an equal need, wherever they live in London, have equal access to treatments. A standard approach across London means people will achieve better healthcare and doctors will have better guidance on what should be offered to patients.

Procedures that are being reviewed
Eight procedures will be reviewed by primary and secondary care clinicians, patient representatives, equality and diversity leads and public health experts:

  • Surgical removal of benign skin lesions (abnormal growth or abnormal appearance of skin)
  • Hip arthroplasty (replacement)
  • Knee arthroplasty (replacement)
  • Knee arthroscopy (keyhole surgery)
  • Interventional treatments for back pain
  • Varicose vein procedures
  • Shoulder decompression (removing bone spurs and soft tissue through keyhole surgery)
  • Cataract surgery (replacing a clouded eye lens with an artificial lens)

Read more – and check back for updates – on the www.healthylondon.org website.
Further information will be published in the resources section as the programme develops.

Business in the Community in association with Public Health England has published the sixth toolkit in the series “taking a whole-person approach to wellbeing“.

A lack of physical activity and poor eating habits leads to an unhealthy workforce. Around a third of adults in England are damaging their health through a lack of physical activity. In fact, one in four women and one in five men in England are defined as inactive, doing less than 30 minutes of moderate physical activity each week. This is costing the UK taxpayer over £60 billion per year. Employers have a responsibility to provide safe workplaces that do not damage an employee’s health and environments that support healthier lifestyle choices.

Working in partnership with employees, employers can take a positive, pro-active approach to healthier workplaces.

Open and download the toolkit.

A new guide has been published to showcase the extensive range of programmes being delivered by the AHSN Network to improve clinical services in the areas of musculoskeletal (MSK), falls, fractures and frailty, all key priorities for the NHS.

Collectively, MSK, falls, fractures and frailty have a major detrimental impact on patients, families and carers, and are a major cost to the NHS.

With a growing and ageing population, health and social care services need to be proactive in their response to this challenge. Whilst many different clinical pathways and services are provided to manage these four problems, there are clear links between them.

Across the 15 Academic Health Science Networks (AHSNs) there is a wealth of experience and practical skills in working with NHS organisations to improve clinical services in these clinical pathways, with service evaluation projects that have been shown to improve patient outcomes and deliver more efficient use of resources.

Compiled by Alison Gowdy, Clinical Innovation Adoption Manager at Oxford AHSN, with input from all 15 AHSNs, this new guide provides a useful overview of these projects.

It is hoped the guide will help shape discussions with Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STPs), commissioners and providers regarding future work to improve services and patient outcomes in these areas, while enabling others to share in learning to help implement and / or build on an existing, proven concept.

Download the guide here.

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