This is a category taken from the full feed of Musculoskeletal and Arthritis news provided by ARMA's members.

Tag: self-management

The NASS Facebook Live sessions have been running since March, helping people to manage their axial SpA (AS) in these unprecedented times and beyond. All of these sessions are available live, allowing comments and questions to be answered. Check the NASS Facebook events page for details of upcoming sessions.

The sessions are also recorded and form part of ‘My AS My Life’ – a new self-management hub on the NASS website.

The A2E deadline has been extended

The Aspiring to Excellence programme 2020 will now close to applications on 18 September 2020.

During these unusual times, NASS has been sharing tops tips through live videos. Topics we’re covering include rib pain, working from home, night-time pain, gardening with AS, mindfulness and looking after yourself emotionally.
You can find all the recordings on the NASS Facebook page.

With everyone now spending a lot more time at home, it could have a significantly negative impact on people’s physical activity levels. For people with musculoskeletal conditions, there are things that can be done to protect health and manage illness, to maintain good physical and mental health.

Provided people are well enough and following the latest government guidelines, exercise matters during this period and it’s more important than ever right now. It can help manage stress and anxiety too. Here are some specific resources, tailored for musculoskeletal health.

Arthritis Action has an online toolkit that enables people to find the resource most relevant. Includes physical and mental health: https://www.arthritisaction.org.uk/onlinesme  

Chartered Society of Physiotherapy: Information on keeping active: https://www.csp.org.uk/public-patient/keeping-active-healthy

Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine (FSEM): If people are staying home but feel well and don’t have symptoms of Covid-19, it’s important to keep up levels of physical activity. This guide, from the contains some simple advice, as well as helpful Moving Medicine resources, to help stay active at home. https://www.fsem.ac.uk/staying-active-at-home/

Versus Arthritis has information pages on self-management that may also be useful for people with arthritis in self-isolation at this time: https://www.versusarthritis.org/about-arthritis/managing-symptoms/managing-your-pain/  

CEO update by Sue Brown

One of the things I love about my job is the variety of things I get involved in. The wide scope of what is covered by musculoskeletal health and the variety of ARMA members, partners and stakeholders means no two days are ever the same.  August has been a month to prepare for the exciting variety of activity we have planned including our annual lecture, a roundtable on pain, an event on physical activity and more webinars.

Physical activity has been quite a theme this month, with the launch of the We Are Undefeatable campaign. I love the positive but realistic messaging which is so relevant to MSK conditions. This will help reinforce the messages from clinicians using Moving Medicine or the RCGP Active Practice Charter. My concern is that when people turn up at their chosen activity, be it a local leisure centre, gym or walking group, staff/volunteers won’t understand MSK and will be concerned about them taking part. This is the reason ARMA supports the parkrun Facebook group for people with MSK conditions, as it gives peer support and encouragement for people to be active in a way that works for them.

ARMA is planning an event for providers of mainstream activities to help them understand how to support people with MSK conditions to be active, and to include them in their activities. The emphasis of We Are Undefeatable is on self-management and being more active without medical supervision or special programmes, just like the parkrun initiative. I hope that we can help those motivated by the campaign to get a positive response wherever they choose to go.

The other big theme of my August has been pain. ARMA collaborated on some qualitative research around chronic pain which I presented at a Chronic Pain Policy Coalition event. It is clear that chronic pain is extremely common. It’s not all MSK related, but at lot of it is. The lack of services for chronic pain leaves patients and healthcare professionals alike struggling to know what to do for the best. That’s why we are promoting IAPT-MSK pain in a webinar later this month. It’s why we are holding a roundtable in October to look at how the situation can be improved. Look out for more from us in the coming months on this.

One thing that pain and physical activity have in common is complexity. There are a whole variety of barriers to people with MSK conditions being active and effective multidisciplinary pain services need to be available at every level from community peer support to specialist services. No one can solve either of these issues alone. Work together – then we might stand a chance.

Since the NHS Long Term Plan (LTP) was published on 7 January 2019, the Universal Personalised Care: Implementing the Comprehensive Model has been published.

The document defines personalised care: people have choice and control over the way their care is planned and delivered based on ‘what matters’ to them and their individual strengths, needs and preferences.

There are six components to the model:

  1. Shared decision making
  2. Personalised care and support planning
  3. Enabling choice, including legal rights to choice
  4. Social prescribing and community-based support
  5. Supported self-management
  6. Personal health budgets and integrated personal budgets.

The document sets out the key principles of each component and what evidence would show that it is implemented.

Social prescribing – includes a reference to the need for this to be appropriately funded. There should be a one stop shop connector service with link workers (up to 5 per Primary Care Network) about to connect people to community groups and voluntary organisations that are supported to receive referrals. There should be community-based approaches to providing peer support. ARMA would argue that there is a role for patient groups in providing this peer support.

Supported self-management – This can include:

  • Health coaching or structured group coaching course
  • Self-management education approaches (face-to-face and virtual), which include disease-specific, generic and online self-management courses
  • Peer support through a link worker

Personal health budgets – People will have an indication of how much money they have available for healthcare and support, enough to meet the health and wellbeing needs and outcomes agreed in the personalised care and support plan. They will be able to use the money to meet their outcomes in ways and at times that make sense to them, as agreed in their personalised care and support plan.

 

Implementation

The document lists 21 actions needed to deliver personalised care at scale. These include:

  • Workforce training, including to all GPs.
  • An intensive face to face training programme for 75,000 health care professionals by 2023/4
  • Recruit and train over 1,000 social prescribing link workers by 2020/21
  • Work with partners in the voluntary and community sector, and others, to explore the best models for commissioning the local voluntary and community sector to support innovative provision.
  • Support for programmes to enable self-management
  • Train up to 500 people with lived experience to become system leaders by 2023/24.

For more details, see the full universal personalised care document.

 

ARMA policy teams and CEOs collaborated to agree a Policy Position Paper on Supported Self-Management for People with Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Conditions. The Policy Position Paper sets out recommendations for change.

The evidence identifies the importance of patients as partners in their own care. While people with musculoskeletal conditions can play a pivotal role in their condition, most are simply unaware of the difference they can make. That’s why the Alliance believes people should be supported to take a proactive role in their health, to live well, feeling confident and in control of their condition with supported self-management. Currently, supported self-management sits at the side-lines yet it works – it improves quality of life and clinical outcomes. In the paper, recommendations include a whole system, integrated approach across the care pathway, joining up public health messaging and clinical care.

ARMA works in partnership with our members and other stakeholders. Please get in touch if you would like to work with us to promote this paper, would like us to write a blog or article for your publication or are interested in other collaboration.

The Welsh Government has published its draft ‘Living with persistent pain in Wales guidance’ for consultation and is seeking views on the draft guidance which will replace the Service Development and Commissioning Directive for Chronic Non-Malignant Pain 2008.

The consultation is on the proposed direction of the draft guidance, which includes: living with pain, supported self-management and health service provision.

More information on the consultation, together with the draft guidance, can be downloaded from the gov.wales website.

The consultation ends 14 September 2018.

To help inform the Arthritis Care / Arthritis Research UK input, Hywel Evans, Policy and Engagement Manager Wales, would be grateful to receive copies of responses to this consultation from ARMA member organisations.

Please send your feedback to hywele@arthritiscare.org.uk .

EULAR has funded a project aimed at understanding the development, evaluation and implementation of mobile phone applications for self-management in patients with rheumatic diseases.

Following a systematic literature teview, the project task force is now at a stage where it would like to gain insights into the patient’s views, perceptions and current use of health apps for self-management.

EULAR therefore kindly asks you to fill in the following survey:
surveymonkey.com/mHealthAppsSurvey
It takes 5 to 10 minutes to complete.