Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Alliance
This is a category taken from the full feed of Musculoskeletal and Arthritis news provided by ARMA's members.
  • The Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Alliance (ARMA) is the umbrella body for the arthritis and musculoskeletal community in the UK, and our mission is to transform the quality of life of people with musculoskeletal conditions. We have 33 member organisations ranging from specialised support groups for rare diseases to major research charities and national professional bodies.

Resources

Sign up for the webinar rescheduled for 15 February 2019 at 12.30—1.30pm

The rescheduled webinar on Friday 15 February 2019 describes the set-up of the Telford Musculoskeletal Service and some of the problems encountered along the way, with the solutions used.

The Service is a single-point of access for rheumatology, pain, physiotherapy, orthopaedics and musculoskeletal services in the NHS within Telford. The service is a prime vendor type model with Shropshire Community Trust holding the main contract and sub-contracting to other NHS and Private providers in the locality.

The speaker is GP Dr Louise Warburton and medical lead for Telford MSK service, which sees a wide variety of patients with MSK and rheumatology problems. She has wide experience in a variety of roles related to MSK services including GP champion for Keele University working in Primary Care MSK research and dissemination. 

Who should attend? Commissioners, first contact practitioners, GPs, hospital consultants, physiotherapists, patients and patient organisations and charities.

The webinar is provided by ARMA and NHS England. Previous registrants do not need to register again.

ARMA webinars are free to access thanks to the support of our partners. We would like to thank Roche Products Limited and Chugai Pharma UK for supporting this webinar.

Despite improvements in life expectancy, England lags behind other countries on many key health outcomes. A new report from the Kings Fund argues that to address this, we need to move away from a system just focused on diagnosing and treating illness towards one that is based on promoting wellbeing and preventing ill health.

Population health is an approach that aims to improve physical and mental health outcomes, promote wellbeing and reduce health inequalities across an entire population. The King’s Fund’s vision is to reduce inequalities and achieve health outcomes on a par with the best in the world by focusing on population health locally, regionally and nationally. Whilst the report does not focus upon it directly, we know MSK health underpins all other aspects of health, as ARMA has always argued. The vision cannot be successful unless MSK health is part of it.

The report outlines a framework for population health and calls for action at national, regional and local levels. This should include: ambitious and binding national goals to drive progress; a cross-government strategy for reducing health inequalities; stronger political and system leadership; greater clarity on the roles and accountability of national bodies and local organisations; and increased investment in prevention, public health and spending that supports population health.

A new paper published [24 October 2018] in the Lancet highlights regional imbalances in health and reveals the huge burden of disability linked to long-term conditions such as low back and neck pain, anxiety and depression, highlighting the need for health services to adapt to managing these conditions. 

The study uses GBD 2016 data on mortality, causes of death, and disability to analyse the burden of disease in the countries of the UK and within local authorities in England by deprivation quintile.

Changes in health in the countries of the UK and 150 English Local Authority areas 1990–2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016

Read more and download this paper from Lancet website.

The latest resource posted to the MSK hub is new support from PHE to increase physical activity for disabled adults.

4 in 5 disabled people report they would like to do more physical activity, highlighting continued barriers that prevent them from being active. The evidence review and infographic can be accessed via the hub, along with a range of other MSK related resources. Why not take a look and see what you can find?

You can now see the video from our recent webinar in the Musculoskeletal Networks series:
Commissioning for Quality: Community-based Rheumatology Service

Presented by Erica Gould, Nurse Consultant at Community Rheumatology Service Modality Partnership, the webinar outlines how a community-based rheumatology service can provide effective management of rheumatology patients, with benefits both to the patients and the usage of clinical resources.

Findings from the pilot study demonstrated that patients requiring disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDS) can easily be managed in a community setting. A community setting with provision of the specialist skills provides patients with local, more convenient care and reduced disengagement. It also optimised the use of local resources – for example, moving some of the routine follow-up activity for rheumatology patients (such as drug monitoring) would undercut the tariff by 30%.

Visit the ARMA Webinars page to watch the presentation and discussion.

 

September always kicks off with a huge surge in requests to the Hypermobility Syndromes Association for assistance with children struggling with school. The HMSA produces a booklet called ‘The Educators Guide to the Hypermobile Student‘. This booklet, beneficial for parents and those in education, can help explain the impact of these conditions on the individual in an educational setting. The guide is available from the website shop, hypermobilityshop.org, and is currently at a reduced price.

Students going into secondary school often start having problems because of the environmental change. Secondary school usually means bigger and heavier backpacks, a larger campus, many flights of stairs and changing classrooms several times a day. The booklet can help you to find ways of reducing the physical stress on our children. Usually, by Christmas children have started to develop the stamina to get through a school day and all may be well from then on.

However, a few children also start creeping into the stage where we see the highest new diagnosis rates of hypermobility … puberty! Others may struggle to keep up with their peers or with feelings of being different. This is the worse age, emotionally, for children to feel they are so different from peers and they often need more support emotionally.

Don’t be afraid of asking questions in the HMSA Family and Education group on Facebook. This group has teachers, OTs, nurses and SENCOs and of course, other families going through the same issues. There is also a section for primary school children to read about their conditions on our website hypermobility.org.

Parents and teachers can also speak to HMSA helpline (033 3011 6388) staff, who will do their best to assist you or find someone who can.

Guest blog by Professor Anthony Woolf, Chair, ARMA

[Republished from the NHS England blog]

Musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions have a huge negative impact on the health of the population.  People with MSK problems making a first approach to health services can find it difficult to access the right support and some experience delays in getting the correct diagnosis and management, which can result in prolonged impact such as ongoing pain and work loss.

Launched a few weeks ago, the Musculoskeletal core capabilities framework for first point of contact practitionershas been developed in partnership by the Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Alliance (ARMA), NHS England, Skills for Health, Public Health England and Health Education England to ensure that people with MSK problems get what they have expressed they want – rapid access to diagnosis and early management advice, being fully involved in their care through shared decision-making and self-management. They want confidence in the advice they are receiving and in the capabilities of the health practitioner, their problems and concerns understood and responded to and they want a holistic approach to their problem.

This framework aims to ensure that the range of healthcare professionals who work with patients with MSK problems can play a full role in helping to manage any MSK problem appropriately at the first point of contact.  Working in a team and sharing challenges, first contact MSK practitioners can ensure the person with an MSK problem gets rapid access to the right support without the person getting lost in what can feel like a maze of different care pathways. The first point of contact is important to ensure that potential emergencies are recognised and that the next step in the pathway occurs seamlessly and as efficiently as possible.  This will also help relieve pressures on primary and secondary care. 

By making it clear what capabilities are required, we hope the framework will encourage training and development to increase the number of practitioners from different professions who will fulfil this vital role. Importantly, this is not about creating a new MSK workforce as many already fulfil this role, but is about recognising existing capabilities within practitioners’ scope of practice and ensuring services are delivered consistently by multi-professional teams.  One challenge might be that we have all become too ‘specialised’ in healthcare, but the person with the MSK problem wants and needs a holistic approach to get the best outcome.

This framework of core capabilities offers clear definitions against which to improve and assure – for employers, clinicians, regulators, primary care training hubs, commissioners and practitioners themselves.  It also emphasises the need for modernised skill sets that support person-centred approaches and include shared decision-making, prevention, and support self-management and focuses on what enables people to stay active and independent.  Most importantly it will give the public assurance of the capabilities of the person they are seeking help from.

There is a growing consensus across health and care for new approaches and targeted interventions to promote healthier ageing. This framework has been developed by the whole musculoskeletal sector – including patients and health professionals – collaborating on an issue we all agree is important. It is focused on the needs and expectations of people with MSK problems; with recognition by the health professions that there needs to be harmonisation of core capabilities across the sector to ensure that the right care is provided from that first point that someone presents with an MSK problem seeking a solution.

ARMA is pleased to have played a part in creating this framework that should make a real difference to patient outcomes.

Arthritis Research UK has developed the educational package Core Skills in Musculoskeletal Care. It has been created by GPs for GPs and aims to support professionals ‘get the basics right’ in musculoskeletal care and equip GPs with the essential knowledge, skill and confidence needed to manage the most common MSK conditions seen in primary and community care.

The package consists of the popular e-learning module hosted on the RCGP website as well as the new hands-on, interactive workshops.

See a video of the workshop in action.

Workshop dates:

  • Glasgow 25 September 2018
  • Manchester 1 November 2018
  • London 27 November 2018

Places are filling up fast so book today to avoid disappointment: www.coreskillsinmsk.co.uk