Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Alliance
This is a category taken from the full feed of Musculoskeletal and Arthritis news provided by ARMA's members.
  • The Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Alliance (ARMA) is the umbrella body for the arthritis and musculoskeletal community in the UK, and our mission is to transform the quality of life of people with musculoskeletal conditions. We have 33 member organisations ranging from specialised support groups for rare diseases to major research charities and national professional bodies.

Patients

There are only a few days left to apply for the prestigious EULAR Edgar Stene Prize Competition 2019. People with rheumatic and musculoskeletal disorders are invited to write about their personal experiences submitting essays on the topic of:

My ideal employer – Work without barriers for people with RMDs

Please find more information in these documents:

Please take a careful look at the deadlines and entry rules mentioned in the respective documents. The deadline for UK entries is Tuesday 11 December 2018, entries should be sent to projects@arma.uk.net by that date.

As with previous years, the national winning essays will be accepted in their native language and the EULAR Secretariat will take care of translating them into English.

EULAR looks forward again to receiving many inspiring and encouraging essays from all over Europe!

More people, more active, more often: three perspectives on physical activity and musculoskeletal health

21 November 2018

Introduced by Sue Brown ARMA CEO and Liam O’Toole, CEO, Versus Arthritis, who partnered with ARMA for the flagship lecture, the three presenters delivered speeches that did not disappoint the rapt audience of health professionals, commissioners, patients, public and NHS health officials and, of course, parkrunners. The discussion about how to overcome the barriers to activity faced by people with musculoskeletal conditions ranged from big-picture societal issues to practical hows-to. 

Michael Brannan, Physical Activity Programme Manager, Public Health England said that strength, balance and co-ordination were often referred to as the ‘forgotten guidelines’ included in the Chief Medical Office Physical Activity Guidelines. While two-thirds of men and half of women achieve the cardiovascular elements of the CMO guidelines, a much smaller proportion meet the strengthening, balance and coordination elements of the CMO guidelines. 

Claire Harris, Physiotherapist from NASS, spoke of the general and specific barriers people face to activity, such as time, transport – especially for people in rural communities – fatigue, financial problems, family support, pain, stiffness, disability, low self-esteem, disability and co-morbidities and how to overcome these, for example, motivational interviewing. 

Nick Pearson, CEO of the popular weekly parkrun, was thought-provoking and unafraid to challenge the status quo. He said, “Many populations most at risk of life-impacting, disabling health conditions are the populations most likely to be inactive, doubling down on their risk levels and potentially creating a ‘health underclass’; these populations are exposed to the highest environment and social risk factors, cut adrift and deprived of the vast majority of health initiatives and interventions. Parkrun has been able to cut through some of these structural, political, and social challenges.”  

The panel then considered questions such as how some of the success of Parkrun could be imitated, followed by audience questions. 

In case you missed it, or want to see it again, the recording of the event is available here.

Twitter, with vlogs from attendees, was popular at the event, you can see the range of tweets and vlogs on #MSKactivity.

Arthritis Action has released the findings from a nation-wide questionnaire-based study looking into the life impacts of arthritis on people of working age in Great Britain. The research, carried out by YouGov, surveyed 2074 people to reveal the effects that the condition can have on personal well-being, life satisfaction, and mental health.

It highlights the true impact of arthritis on the millions of people living with it every day, affecting all aspects of their lives, from their mental health to their family life, work, social activities, and physical health.

Read the report here (pdf).

September always kicks off with a huge surge in requests to the Hypermobility Syndromes Association for assistance with children struggling with school. The HMSA produces a booklet called ‘The Educators Guide to the Hypermobile Student‘. This booklet, beneficial for parents and those in education, can help explain the impact of these conditions on the individual in an educational setting. The guide is available from the website shop, hypermobilityshop.org, and is currently at a reduced price.

Students going into secondary school often start having problems because of the environmental change. Secondary school usually means bigger and heavier backpacks, a larger campus, many flights of stairs and changing classrooms several times a day. The booklet can help you to find ways of reducing the physical stress on our children. Usually, by Christmas children have started to develop the stamina to get through a school day and all may be well from then on.

However, a few children also start creeping into the stage where we see the highest new diagnosis rates of hypermobility … puberty! Others may struggle to keep up with their peers or with feelings of being different. This is the worse age, emotionally, for children to feel they are so different from peers and they often need more support emotionally.

Don’t be afraid of asking questions in the HMSA Family and Education group on Facebook. This group has teachers, OTs, nurses and SENCOs and of course, other families going through the same issues. There is also a section for primary school children to read about their conditions on our website hypermobility.org.

Parents and teachers can also speak to HMSA helpline (033 3011 6388) staff, who will do their best to assist you or find someone who can.

Help us guide future research about problematic knee replacements

The British Association for Surgery of the Knee (BASK) is running a Priority Setting Partnership (PSP) in partnership with the James Lind Alliance (JLA). The aim of this process is to bring patients and carers together with a range of healthcare professionals. We want all groups to highlight uncertainties relating to the assessment, management and rehabilitation of ‘patients with a problematic knee replacement’. We will thereby identify future research questions and ultimately publish a list of ‘top 10 research priorities’. This will guide funders for future research.

What can you do to help?

If you have experience of problematic knee replacements as a patient, carer or professional: Tell us the top 3 questions you would like to see answered by future research at www.jlarevisionknee.com. The survey goes live on Monday 10 September 2018 and we are hoping to get as many responses within the first month as possible.

For any queries or please email jlarevisionknee@gmail.com

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy launches a summer campaign which aims to tackle the growing issue of physical inactivity across the UK.

‘Love Activity, Hate Exercise?’ addresses the emotional as well as physical barriers millions of people with long-term conditions face in being more physically active.

The campaign is aimed at people aged 40-70 years old that are living with conditions such as arthritis, diabetes and heart disease, after research from the CSP found that more than 30% are completely inactive each week.

It was developed through a series of focus groups and research with patients and physiotherapists, and is designed to raise awareness of the expertise the profession has in getting people with long-term conditions more active.

CSP assistant director Sara Hazzard said: “We wanted to develop something that harnessed the expert knowledge our members possess to ultimately promote Physiotherapy and its unique role to improve the health of the nation.”

“Our research found that patients see physios in a really positive light but that they aren’t always associated with physical activity. So unlike campaigns that are often aimed at the general public, ours has been designed to reach the people who can be – or are already being – helped by their advice. It aims to take an empathetic approach and build on the trust that the public has for the profession.”

The CSP has developed digital content that is built around the specific barriers that were identified in the insight phase, along with practical advice on how those concerns can be overcome. Additionally a series of case study interviews will aim to inspire conversations between physiotherapists and their patients about activity levels.

For more information visit csp.org.uk/activity or join in the conversation on Twitter using the #loveactivity.

The Pembrokeshire Lupus Support Group and LUPUS UK are petitioning the Secretary of State for Health at the Welsh Assembly Government to remove the ‘gate keeper principle’ from their healthcare provision.

Patients with lupus and other rare autoimmune illnesses in Wales are being denied the right to access expertise that could really benefit them in the long term.

You can see more about the problem, read the petition and sign it here.

On behalf of Nele Caeyers, Chair of the EULAR Standing Committee of People with Arthritis/Rheumatism in Europe (PARE); Dieter Wiek, EULAR Vice President, representing PARE; and Polina Pchelnikova, Working Group leader of the Edgar Stene Prize; the EULAR secretariat is delighted to announce the call for entries for the Edgar Stene Prize Competition 2019.

People with rheumatic and musculoskeletal disorders are invited to write about their personal experiences submitting essays on the topic of:

“My ideal employer – Work without barriers for people with RMDs”

Please find more information in the attached documents [both PDFs]:

Please take a careful look at the deadlines and entry rules mentioned in the respective documents. The deadline for UK entries is Tuesday 11 December 2018, entries should be sent to projects@arma.uk.net by that date.

As with previous years, the national winning essays will be accepted in their native language and the EULAR Secretariat will take care of translating them into English.

EULAR looks forward again to receiving many inspiring and encouraging essays from all over Europe!