This is a category taken from the full feed of Musculoskeletal and Arthritis news provided by ARMA's members.

Tag: physical activity

Health Matters is a Public Health England publication containing facts, resources and information on major public health issues for public health professionals, local authorities and CCG commissioners.

The edition released at the end of January 2020 focuses on physical activity for the prevention and management of long-term conditions.

Readers of this newsletter will all be aware that physical activity is essential for musculoskeletal health. Every month we seem to report new publications on the subject. This month is no exception: two recent publications highlight the challenges and propose some solutions.

Researchers have studied adolescents’ activity levels in 146 countries and found that more than 80% are not meeting the recommended levels of activity. In the UK in 2016, more than 85% of girls were not active enough, and neither were almost 75% of boys. It was great to see that the BBC coverage of the story included stronger bones and muscles as one of the reasons activity is important.

The British Medical Association has published Get a Move on: Steps to increase physical activity levels in the UK. This report makes policy recommendations across four core parts of people’s lives – travel, leisure, school and work – and sets out the steps government and policymakers should take to increase physical activity levels across the UK.

The report also includes reference to the important role of activity to “maintain or improve musculoskeletal strength, supporting healthy ageing and reducing the chance of falls for older people. For example, physical activity can reduce the likelihood of hip fractures by up to 68%.”

 

Health Education England e-Learning for Healthcare (HEE e-LfH) has worked with Public Health England and Sport England to launch a new physical activity e-learning programme to help healthcare professionals to champion physical activity with patients.

The e-learning programme, which is aimed at GPs, nurses and other healthcare professionals, will familiarise the learner with the UK Chief Medical Officers’ Physical Activity guidelines.

This e-learning course prepares GPs, nurses and other healthcare professionals to champion the benefits of physical activity with their patients and, in doing so, help prevent and manage a range of common physical and mental health conditions.

Among the course resources are a ‘how to’ video on “Motivational Interviewing” and a guide to “Promoting Physical Activity in Primary Care”. Satellite sessions explore people’s changing needs across the life course and the crucial impact of physical activity on children, young people and older adults. This programme also gives a comprehensive guide to the use of physical activity in the clinical management of long-term conditions including: cancer, cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, musculoskeletal health and mental health. 

The programme is available on the e-LfH Hub and via AICC links.
For more information about the programme, including access details, visit the e-lfh.org.uk website.

Last October, Moving Medicine was launched by the Honourable Matt Hancock, Secretary of State for Health and Social Care. The free, evidence-based resources, available at movingmedicine.ac.uk support high quality conversations on physical activity across a broad range of chronic diseases including musculoskeletal pain, inflammatory rheumatic conditions and primary prevention, to mention a few.

The resources are all developed with experts, healthcare professionals and patients, and are endorsed by professional bodies and charities, including ARMA. Whether you have 1 minute, 5 minutes, or more minutes to speak with patients about physical activity, Moving Medicine will help support this. 

For further information visit movingmedicine.ac.uk, contact us contactus@movingmedicine.ac.uk, or follow us on social: @movingmedicine on twitter, facebook.com/movingmed or @movingmedicineuk on Instagram.

CEO update by Sue Brown

One of the things I love about my job is the variety of things I get involved in. The wide scope of what is covered by musculoskeletal health and the variety of ARMA members, partners and stakeholders means no two days are ever the same.  August has been a month to prepare for the exciting variety of activity we have planned including our annual lecture, a roundtable on pain, an event on physical activity and more webinars.

Physical activity has been quite a theme this month, with the launch of the We Are Undefeatable campaign. I love the positive but realistic messaging which is so relevant to MSK conditions. This will help reinforce the messages from clinicians using Moving Medicine or the RCGP Active Practice Charter. My concern is that when people turn up at their chosen activity, be it a local leisure centre, gym or walking group, staff/volunteers won’t understand MSK and will be concerned about them taking part. This is the reason ARMA supports the parkrun Facebook group for people with MSK conditions, as it gives peer support and encouragement for people to be active in a way that works for them.

ARMA is planning an event for providers of mainstream activities to help them understand how to support people with MSK conditions to be active, and to include them in their activities. The emphasis of We Are Undefeatable is on self-management and being more active without medical supervision or special programmes, just like the parkrun initiative. I hope that we can help those motivated by the campaign to get a positive response wherever they choose to go.

The other big theme of my August has been pain. ARMA collaborated on some qualitative research around chronic pain which I presented at a Chronic Pain Policy Coalition event. It is clear that chronic pain is extremely common. It’s not all MSK related, but at lot of it is. The lack of services for chronic pain leaves patients and healthcare professionals alike struggling to know what to do for the best. That’s why we are promoting IAPT-MSK pain in a webinar later this month. It’s why we are holding a roundtable in October to look at how the situation can be improved. Look out for more from us in the coming months on this.

One thing that pain and physical activity have in common is complexity. There are a whole variety of barriers to people with MSK conditions being active and effective multidisciplinary pain services need to be available at every level from community peer support to specialist services. No one can solve either of these issues alone. Work together – then we might stand a chance.

A new campaign, We are Undefeatable, launched on 2 September from Sport England and associated partners including Versus Arthritis.

The campaign aims to help people with health conditions find ways to get active. With a long term condition you are two times more likely to be inactive. Physical activity plays a powerful role, it can help manage 20 or more conditions and reduce the risk of many health conditions by up to 40%.

Sport England are challenging the existing narrative and working with partners to challenge the status quo. They created a unified physical activity campaign which challenges misconceptions and finds a strong emotional platform to engage and motivate and sustain behaviour change across health conditions.  It’s designed with the perspective and lived experience of people with health conditions.

It’s aimed at an audience from ages 30-64 years old and beyond and at people who are doing a little physical activity, less than 30 minutes, or none. For more information see Twitter @undefeatable or www.weareundefeatable.co.uk

EULAR has published a new lay summary: EULAR recommendations for physical activity in people with inflammatory arthritis and osteoarthritis

EULAR is disseminating the lay versions of the recommendations to patient organisations and healthcare professionals to support patients and carers in managing their condition.

For more lay summaries of EULAR recommendations, go to the EULAR website.