This is a category taken from the full feed of Musculoskeletal and Arthritis news provided by ARMA's members.
  • The Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Alliance (ARMA) is the umbrella body for the arthritis and musculoskeletal community in the UK, and our mission is to transform the quality of life of people with musculoskeletal conditions. We have 33 member organisations ranging from specialised support groups for rare diseases to major research charities and national professional bodies.

Tag: exercise

by Dr Hamish Reid, Consultant in Sport and Exercise Medicine, Moving Medicine design and development lead

Moving Medicine is an exciting new initiative by the Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine in partnership with Public Health England and Sport England. It is dedicated to spreading best practice, research and advice to clinicians and patients to create a healthier, happier and more active nation. On the 16th October 2018 the initiative was formally launched by the Honourable Matt Hancock, Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, headlining the flagship set of resources to support high quality conversations on physical activity across a broad range of chronic diseases including musculoskeletal pain.

Why is it important?

The UK is currently suffering epidemic levels of physical inactivity in keeping with global trends. This inactivity causes a heavy burden of morbidity and mortality. This burden, In contrast to communicable disease, can be prevented and effectively treated through moving more. In no areas is this more important that musculoskeletal conditions.

At the heart of intervention in healthcare lie conversations between healthcare professionals and members of the public. These conversations provide a unique opportunity to interact with the least active members of society, but many healthcare professionals currently lack the skills, knowledge and systems to deliver impactful conversations on physical activity.

How has it been developed?

The ‘prescribing movement’ resources have been developed by a large team of Sport and Exercise Medicine doctors in consultation with 300 medical specialists, general practitioners, researchers and patients. The foundations of the content lie in robust reviews of the literature on physical activity in specific diseases and differ from other resources summarising the evidence base on physical activity as the structure has been designed by clinicians for clinicians to use in practise. A knowledge into action framework, Delphi study and behavioural change framework have underpinned this iterative development process. The result enables the user to dig as deep as they want to into the evidence base, embedded in a time-based framework to support good quality conversations based on established behavioural change techniques and motivational interviewing theory.

What does this mean for musculoskeletal care?

The Moving Medicine musculoskeletal pain resource has been designed with experts in musculoskeletal care in partnership with many ARMA members. Due to the exceptional input from the ARMA network this resource has been developed to fulfil an unmet need in the excellent resources available. It is a practical resource to support and inform clinical staff in routine practice and has been designed to support conversations.

We encourage everyone to use and share the resources. If you are keen to find out more or contribute to the Moving Medicine to get in touch with us at contactus@movingmedicine.ac.uk, join our Facebook ambassador group or follow us on twitter @movingmedicine – we would love to hear from you.

Visit the website at www.movingmedicine.ac.uk.

Taking place on Wednesday 21 November 2018 at 6pm in London.

Hear and debate three perspectives on physical activity at the Annual ARMA Lecture, this year in partnership with Versus Arthritis. Three outstanding speakers, Nick Pearson, CEO parkrun, Michael Brennan, Physical Activity Programme Manager, Public Health England and Claire Harris, Physiotherapist speak to the theme: More people, more active, more often: three perspectives on physical activity and musculoskeletal health

Physical activity is good for promoting musculoskeletal health and helps alleviate the symptoms of musculoskeletal conditions. Yet nearly a quarter of adults in the UK are physically inactive. Getting people active is an obvious way to reduce the costs of MSK conditions to individuals, the NHS and the economy. If activity brings such benefits, why is this so difficult? How can we overcome the barriers people face in getting more active? And what additional barriers are faced by those who have an MSK condition? How can we harness the powers of statutory, voluntary, private sectors and communities to tackle this?

The evening will begin with a drinks reception and the lecture will conclude with a question and answer session, with questions taken from an audience of leading health and public health professionals, policy makers, commissioners, patients, and representatives of professional bodies.

Tickets are available here

The ARMA annual lecture will be on 21 November on the theme of physical activity. Three speakers will discuss three different perspectives on how to get more people, more active, more often. The event will discuss the roles of statutory, voluntary, private sectors and communities in addressing this important challenge.

  • the CEO of parkrun
  • the physical activity programme manager from Public Health England
  • a musculoskeletal specialist physiotherapist.

Look out for booking details coming soon.

The Fit4Change app converts miles to money for charities, giving an extra incentive to take regular physical activity that will improve your MSK health. You can use it for running, walking, cycling and exercising indoors.

Just download the Fit4Change app to your phone, select Arthritis and Musc Alliance as your chosen charity, remember to start before you begin your activity and finish at the end, and the app does the rest. It’s a simple way to support our work – just remember to start the app whenever you start your activity.

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy launches a summer campaign which aims to tackle the growing issue of physical inactivity across the UK.

‘Love Activity, Hate Exercise?’ addresses the emotional as well as physical barriers millions of people with long-term conditions face in being more physically active.

The campaign is aimed at people aged 40-70 years old that are living with conditions such as arthritis, diabetes and heart disease, after research from the CSP found that more than 30% are completely inactive each week.

It was developed through a series of focus groups and research with patients and physiotherapists, and is designed to raise awareness of the expertise the profession has in getting people with long-term conditions more active.

CSP assistant director Sara Hazzard said: “We wanted to develop something that harnessed the expert knowledge our members possess to ultimately promote Physiotherapy and its unique role to improve the health of the nation.”

“Our research found that patients see physios in a really positive light but that they aren’t always associated with physical activity. So unlike campaigns that are often aimed at the general public, ours has been designed to reach the people who can be – or are already being – helped by their advice. It aims to take an empathetic approach and build on the trust that the public has for the profession.”

The CSP has developed digital content that is built around the specific barriers that were identified in the insight phase, along with practical advice on how those concerns can be overcome. Additionally a series of case study interviews will aim to inspire conversations between physiotherapists and their patients about activity levels.

For more information visit csp.org.uk/activity or join in the conversation on Twitter using the #loveactivity.

Mental health problems are common and account for the largest single source of disability in the UK.

Recognising the many benefits physical activity can bring to mental health and wellbeing, The Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine UK and the Royal College of Psychiatrists with the support of Mind has published an evidence-based position statement: “The Role of Physical Activity and Sport in Mental Health“. The statement contains a guide to physical activity as an intervention for health professionals, sports participants, schools, parents and carers.

The Faculty recognises that living with an MSK condition can lead to mental health issues and this evidence-based statement promotes physical activity, including the use of green space, as way to prevent and manage mental health problems connected to MSK conditions such as depression, anxiety and stress.

Read the position statement on the fsem.ac.uk website.

Arthritis Action will be holding a new two-day Self-Management Event on 2-3 May 2018 between 2pm–4.30pm at Blackpool Central Library, Queen Street, FY1 1PX

The aim is to help attendees take control of the symptoms of their arthritis, covering topics such as:

  • The impact of physical therapies
  • How you can best manage your pain
  • The benefits of exercise and a healthy diet
  • Ways to work in partnership with healthcare professionals

This event will be free of charge and refreshments will be provided, and is open to all.

For more information, please contact info@arthritisaction.org.uk or 020 3781 7120 and Arthritis Action will be able to provide you with further details.

Alternatively, please register via this Eventbrite link.

Business in the Community in association with Public Health England has published the sixth toolkit in the series “taking a whole-person approach to wellbeing“.

A lack of physical activity and poor eating habits leads to an unhealthy workforce. Around a third of adults in England are damaging their health through a lack of physical activity. In fact, one in four women and one in five men in England are defined as inactive, doing less than 30 minutes of moderate physical activity each week. This is costing the UK taxpayer over £60 billion per year. Employers have a responsibility to provide safe workplaces that do not damage an employee’s health and environments that support healthier lifestyle choices.

Working in partnership with employees, employers can take a positive, pro-active approach to healthier workplaces.

Open and download the toolkit.